30 March 2009

"Adult" Films

.
They aren't adult films. If you have to categorise them by human development, they're adolescent films.

But really, they're porn. The Home Secretary's husband pays money for porn.

7 comments:

Ben Trovato said...

Indeed. It's a bit like calling profanities 'strong language.' Shakespeare wrote strong language, (as did P G Wodehouse, come to that!): so strong that they didn't need to sink to profanity to engage, entertain or elevate...

Fiorella said...

I don't know about the definition of Shakespeare's 'strong language', Ben. Some of his innuendos would make a gynaecologist blush.

Ben Trovato said...

Good point - but when I was thinking of strong language it was some of his more elevated pasages.

And even in his bawdy - which I agree is fertile ground for fnaar fnaar jokes, he doesn't descend to effing and blinding every two words in the way any Channel 4 programme billed as having 'strong language' does.

eulogos said...

I have never heard of "blinding."
Other than as putting someone's eyes out. This must be an American vs English thing.

Also the reference to the Home Secretary's husband was unintelligible to me. Is this something which has been in the news over there?

I was amazed when the Austrailian blogger at Sentire Cum Ecclesia (a good blog, by the way) didn't know who Jeremiah Wright was. (Obama's former pastor.) The internet makes one blog as close to us as another, so we forget that bloggers and readers may be in different countries and hear different daily news reports.

Not to mention, I guess, different rude words.

I actually don't know what fnaar fnaar jokes are either.

Is blinding something to do with that word for "covered with a sanguineous fluid" which is considered to be such a nasty word in your part of the world?

Susan Peterson

Ben Trovato said...

Eulogos,

The reference to the Home Secretary's husband seemed pretty clear to me: he had been paying money to view 'adult files.' It came to light and was a minor scandal here as the money was then claimed back as a parliamentary expense.

Blinding: as you say, almost exclusively in the euphemistic phrase 'effing and blinding.'

Fnaar fnaar is indeed a very obscure and local usage, orginating from a childish 'grown up' comic and denoting adult laughter at coarse jokes.

As has been pointed out before: two nations divided by a common language...

Londiniensis said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Londiniensis said...

Paths of Glory, Fury, Twelve Angry Men, On the Waterfront, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Streecar Named Desire, Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf? (to name only a few big-studio productions), now those are adult films ...